City council makes pledge to protect all parks

Stanley Park

LIVERPOOL City Council has announced that all of the city’s parks are to be protected forever.

The city’s Acting Mayor, Councillor Wendy Simon, is set to make the plans official, seeing the protection of 100 parks and green spaces.

In a unique partnership with the charity Fields in Trust, Liverpool will become the first local authority to adopt this vision, ensuring that the outdoor areas will not be built on or sold off, safeguarding them and ensuring a tangible legacy for local communities.

The decision will also outline the ambition that every resident will live no more than a ten-minute walk from a high quality green space – this could be a park, a smaller neighbourhood green space, football pitches or play area.

Liverpool’s Cabinet Member for Regeneration and Highways, Councillor Sharon Connor, said: “There are a huge number of benefits to working in partnership with Fields In Trust, but at the heart of it, we can ensure all our residents have access to our parks and in doing so improve health and wellbeing across the city.”

The announcement forms part of The Great Outdoors pledge – one of ten promises made by the city council to build a better, brighter future for all.

Through partnership work, it will secure the future of dozens of parks and green spaces across the city in a phased approach which aims to be completed by the end of 2023.

For the first phase, Fields In Trust has carried out a review which has identified the spaces which have the most potential to improve physical and mental wellbeing. As a result, 20 areas – which equates to 60 per cent of the city’s green space – will be protected in the first 12 months. By the end of the process, more than 1,000 hectares of land will be protected.

Liverpool City Council will retain ownership of the green spaces and will continue to be responsible for the maintenance of all the parks.